CRIA

SB 711 - Providing EIFDs/CRIAs a Larger Share of Property Taxes

RSG is one of the most active consultants working on a variety of area and project based tax increment financing districts in California.  But despite the interest in EIFDs, CRIAs and other tools, many communities find these fall short of what is needed simply because their own share of the tax levy is so small – often less than 10 cents on the dollar.  What gave rise to redevelopment agencies was the restriction on how cities could raise property tax rates after Proposition 13; cities found that redevelopment allowed more taxes to be retained and invested locally for projects to grow the economic base, provide the largest source of affordable housing assistance outside of tax credits, and fund all types of infrastructure. The newer tools are less helpful because they are limited to how much a local agency may be able to muster up from its own (often small) share of property taxes.

SB 711 proposes a focused change to this tool by allowing the State’s Strategic Growth Council to decrease what a city (or county) would have otherwise lost to the Educational Revenue Augmentation Fund to provide a larger share of the property taxes for certain TIF districts.  Expanding EIFDs and CRIAs by creating a more useful revenue stream will help the state achieve GHG and VMT goals, while making local communities healthier, affordable and prosperous.  ERAF took anywhere from 25% or more of a city or county’s share of the local taxes away – permanently.  This could be a big deal if communities get behind this. Take a look at the sponsor’s SB 711 fact sheet.  The California League of Cities are seeking support from local communities. 

Could Now Be the Time for a CRIA?

Copyright American Planning Association Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

Copyright American Planning Association
Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

AB 2492 extends Community Revitalization and Investment Areas to wealthier regions of the state, without much change to financial benefits of these tax increment financing (TIF) districts.

Last month, RSG discussed the limited financial benefits of Enhanced Infrastructure Financing Districts, one of several newer tax increment financing tools that provide limited benefits similar to redevelopment financing. Community Revitalization and Investment Authorities (CRIAs) are similarly structured and provide these tools AND opportunities for other community development tools. These characteristics have attracted some of our clients to evaluate their benefit. As it turned out, most of California could not benefit from a CRIA given the narrow socioeconomic requirements. 

However, just this week, the Governor signed Assembly Bill (AB) 2492 (Alejo) into law that makes changes to CRIAs, so we took a hard look at these changes and how they affect cities looking for help on community development projects. As it turns out, AB 2492 primarily expands the net on eligibility for CRIAs, but fails to provide much needed new capital to communities.

Here are the main changes:

  • More communities qualify – a greater number of lower income neighborhoods qualify because AB 2492 allows wealthier areas of the state to identify CRIAs in areas that have a median income less than 80 percent of the city or county median income, not just the state;
  • More flexibility - Added flexibility in measuring what parts of communities qualify by allowing the use of census tracts and/or block groups;
  • Any California Environmental Protection Agency-designated “disadvantaged community” automatically qualifies for CRIA - this certainly helps some very low and low income neighborhoods that would otherwise not qualify under the old law; and
  • Some added financial benefit – in addition to tax increment generated by the CRIA, special districts may now have the authority to allocate funds from certain tax and assessment revenues to the CRIA.  Cities and counties already had this ability.

We would love to see more done to make these districts more attractive by:

  • increasing the amount of tax increment revenues,
  • lowering the costs for startup, and
  • providing some other efficiencies like those RSG outlined in last month’s article for EIFDs. 

It’s important to note -  qualifying alone does not mean this tool is right for you.  It’s important to look at the financial feasibility carefully before jumping ahead.

Written by Jim Simon, a Principal at RSG