Low Income Housing

CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE PASSES BILLS DESIGNED TO COMBAT AFFORDABLE HOUSING CRISIS

More than a dozen bills designed to help communities in California combat an affordable housing crisis were approved by the California Legislature on Friday, September 15, 2017 and sent to the Governor for his approval.  This past year marks the Legislature’s “Year of Housing,” wherein more than one hundred housing proposals were introduced and debated in order to provide for assistance in funding for affordable housing development, streamlining local government approval of housing projects, restoring authority to impose inclusionary housing requirements on private housing developers, and creating more state-wide Anti-NIMBY laws.  Governor Brown is expected to sign at least three major bills in the package:  SB 2, SB 3 and SB 35.

SB 2, by Sen. Toni Atkins, D-San Diego, would provide for a “permanent source” of funds for affordable housing development through the creation of a $75 fee on most recorded documents (except for home sales).  This fee is expected to generate $200-300 million per year that can be used for affordable housing development.  Half of the funds generated in 2018 would be made available to local governments for updating planning documents and zoning ordinances in order to streamline housing production, and the other half would go to the state for homeless assistance programs.  Beginning in 2019, 70% of the funds would be directly allocated to local governments for a variety of affordable housing programs, and the other 30% would be used by the state for mixed income multifamily housing, farmworker housing and other programs.

SB 3, by Sen. Jim Beall, D-Campbell, would place a $4 billion statewide housing bond on the November 2018 state ballot, with bond proceeds to be used to fund a number of existing housing programs:  $1.5 billion of the funds would go to the state’s Multifamily Housing Program for affordable housing development loans, $1 billion of the funds would go to the state’s CalVet veteran’s home loan program, with the remainder of the funds allocated for the CalHome down payment, farmworker housing, transit-oriented development, mortgage assistance programs and infrastructure supporting infill housing. 

SB 35, by Sen. Scott Wiener, D-San Francisco, creates a streamlined approval process for housing developments in communities that have not approved enough housing to keep up with regional fair share housing goals.  Eligible projects do not need to obtain conditional use permits and can take advantage of lower state-mandated parking standards.  To take advantage of this process, the proposed development must be on an urban infill site, the development must not be in the coastal zone, agricultural land or other sensitive areas.  Furthermore, the developer taking advantage of this streamlined process (an optional right for the developer) must pay prevailing wages and, in some cases, certify that it will use a “skilled and trained workforce” to complete the project.  Critics of SB 35 believe that it will impose extraordinary costs on affordable housing construction, thus hindering the legislature’s ultimate goal.

Governor Jerry Brown has until October 15, 2017 to sign or veto these bills.  Do you think these bills will adequately fix housing issues in your local community?  What are your local communities doing to address these issues, and how do these actions align or conflict with these proposed bills?  We would love to hear your thoughts.  Please share them with tmatthews@webrsg.com.

This blog was Co-Authored by Millay Kogan, RSG Analyst and Tara Matthews, RSG Partner

RSG Principal Hitta Mosesman Featured Speaker at Housing CA Conference (Sacramento) - March 2017

Housing California is the State’s leading housing organization with a mission to educate lawmakers and others on stabilizing housing, creating more housing opportunities, and implementing proven solutions that reduce the number of homeless men, women, and children in communities. The focus of Housing California is Land Use, Budget and Funding, and Homelessness.  The annual 2017 Housing CA conference, with over 1,400 in attendance, was “Block by Block – Improving Neighborhood Health.”   Workshops focused on all aspects of housing and homelessness, including financing, funding sources, policy, advocacy and new and emerging affordable housing solutions.

Hitta Mosesman, partner and principal with nearly 20 years of consulting experience in affordable housing, finance, real estate and community development, was a featured panel speaker on Community Land Trusts (CLTs) as an innovative method of ensuring affordable housing for generations.  The panel included Mark Asturias, Executive Director of the Irvine Community Land Trust (and City of Irvine’s Housing Manager), Jean Diaz, Executive Director of the San Diego Land Trust and Stephen King, Executive Director of the Oakland Land Trust.  The panel’s joint presentation focused on explaining CLT structures and benefits, as well as the different CLT models (home ownership, rental and co-op).  A link to the presentation is provided below.

https://media.wix.com/ugd/209952_d643b5c0976d49508c0e70fc98150613.pdf

 

Seeking Greater Housing Affordability

Copyright American Planning Association Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

Copyright American Planning Association
Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

A recent Urban Land Institute Terwilliger Center for Housing article emphasizes the scope of the US housing shortage. According to the article, new residential construction is below its historic average and even Great Recession-era levels.

Currently, much new apartment development aims for the high end of the market to make the financials work for developers. Rising land and labor costs, local regulations and NIMBYism make it even more difficult and expensive to build new housing. 

Many cities are spending precious funds to subsidize rent-restricted units, proving that we as a society care about housing affordability. Maybe we should consider the maxim of “first, do no harm.” How can cities reduce barriers to encourage more housing development, both market-rate and rent-restricted? How can we get community stakeholders to recognize that some development and change is needed to accommodate new residents and maintain affordability for renters? 

We passionately discuss topics like this affecting cities and towns at the RSG office, in search of solutions. Contact us today if you’re looking for such solutions.

Written by Dima Galkin, an Associate at RSG

Affordable Housing at Its Best

Photo courtesy of http://www.amcalalegre.com/irvine-irvine/alegre-apartments-apartment-home/photos/

Photo courtesy of http://www.amcalalegre.com/irvine-irvine/alegre-apartments-apartment-home/photos/

Alegre Apartments, an example of successful affordable housing development, opened in June 2015 in northern Irvine. The award-winning affordable housing community developed by AMCAL in partnership with the City of Irvine and the Irvine Community Land Trust, won the Kennedy Commission of Orange County’s project of the year award for 2015.

The development achieved LEED Gold building certification with sustainability features. LEED for Homes is a national, voluntary, rating system administered by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).

Alegre provides 103 spacious one- to four-bedroom apartments for low, very low, and extremely low income households. Amenities include a pool, kids’ water splash, barbecue area, tot lot, and a large, two-story clubhouse with offices, computer lab, media room, game room, and fitness center.

AMCAL has partnered with LifeSTEPS, Families Forward, the County of Orange and United Cerebral Palsy to provide social services. Alegre is the sixtieth residential community developed by AMCAL.

Without redevelopment property tax increment set aside for affordable housing and federal housing funds constantly threatened to be cut in Congress, financing such affordable housing projects is increasingly difficult. The HOME Investment Partnerships Program gives states and cities money to address local affordable housing needs, but Congress wants to slash funding.

RSG helped the Irvine Community Land Trust develop the Alegre Apartments by requesting and evaluating developers’ proposals, negotiating agreements, and providing additional guidance and insight. Contact RSG to help you develop your own version of the Alegre Apartments!

Written by Hitta Mosesman, a Principal at RSG